Frank’s Beach, Lummi Island

Graphite, China Marker on paper
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EXHIBITION:

Celebrate Puget Sound

Puget Sound has been referred to as, “a vast marine labyrinth of inlets and islands, bordered by mountains”. But take a closer look and you discover a living example of fractal geometry, the same elements and order repeating on ever smaller scales. Each inlet is b ordered by; its own “mountain ranges” of rock and populated by even smaller islands. The shoreline is cut by ever more inlets, creating “pocket worlds”. These intimate spaces between smaller rock outcrops are what I love most. Some are only a few feet wide, yet often come complete with their own beach, driftwood pile, little rock “islands”, overhanging shade trees and vista of the horizon. Each is unique and arguably more beautiful than any landscape architect could conjure. A whole realm in miniature that never fails to deliver the rush of discovery and wonder. And so it goes, down to the smallest tide pool.

The small acrylic painting depicts the view from my home on a particularly vivid day last spring. Looking west over Rosario Straight to Matia and Sucia Islands, alternating rows of sunlight and dark cloud drift over a silken sea producing the most extreme contrasts and textures. Each island in turn lights up with color and detail, and, next moment, fades to a mere outline of deep, flat indigo.

The smaller China marker drawings are scenes from Lummi Island where I love. Though “pocket sized”, each contains all the elements of grander landscapes, reflecting my fascination for the large present in the small.